[CnD] How Do You Know When Something is Simmering?

Dani Pagador pocketfulofspry at gmail.com
Sat Jul 8 16:12:28 EDT 2017


The beans will go in to crock pot chili. I've got leftover bell
pepper, onion, diced tomato, and ground beef I need to use. I want to
bulk up the chili with more fiber, so thought a blend of beans would
be a good thing. There are also hot dogs and potatoes, so I may be
able to cook all that we'll eat over the weekend over the course of
today.

It'll be at least 90 here over the next three days--I shouldn't
complain, because it's hotter in Nevada and Arizona than in HI. But I
don't like humid and sticky; it makes my mind sluggish and sticky.
Ick. So the more I can get done in the kitchen, the less I'll have to
stand by the heat sources.

More Later,
Dani, off to cook the chili



On 7/8/17, Teresa Mullen via Cookinginthedark
<cookinginthedark at acbradio.org> wrote:
>
>
> Teresa Sanchez sent from my iPhone
>
>> On Jul 8, 2017, at 8:07 AM, Deborah Barnes via hello I agree with all of
>> these suggestions, when I have done beans before I put the man, I let the
>> water boil rapidly then once the beans are in I M boil for a little bit
>> maybe at least five minutes then I lower the stove to medium and cover,
>> like I want to the magic message says once you don't hear the rapid boil,
>> and it is sort of quiet boiling then your beans are simmering, no you do
>> not have to babysit them.just stir them every half an hour like another
>> message said, which I do as well I don't put oil in mine  are used a
>> couple of strips of bacon or ham hocks to give them flavour in your case
>> you said you're making chilli well you can remove the bacon or ham hock
>> which room and use that if you are using bacon or the other.happy cooking
>> Cookinginthedark <cookinginthedark at acbradio.org> wrote:
>>
>> Hi Dani,
>>
>> Well, when the water is barely simmering, I can usually hear just a little
>> sound; it doesn't sound like a true boil, but it's not like there's no
>> activity.  But it's hard for me to hear unless it's really quiet.  Plus
>> there's some steam coming up that you can feel if your hand is above the
>> pot a little, but it's not bunches of steam like when there's a real high
>> boil.
>>
>> Not sure this helps any, but that's my take on it.  As I rarely cook these
>> days, I had to reach way back in my memory to remember my nonvisual cues.
>> <g<
>>
>> Deb B.
>>
>> -----Original Message-----
>> From: Eileen Scrivani via Cookinginthedark
>> [mailto:cookinginthedark at acbradio.org]
>> Sent: Saturday, July 08, 2017 10:28 AM
>> To: cookinginthedark at acbradio.org
>> Cc: Eileen Scrivani
>> Subject: Re: [CnD] How Do You Know When Something is Simmering?
>>
>> Hi Dani,
>>
>> Once the water comes to a boil, reduce the flame to a very low one, and
>> let your pot continue cooking for the designated length of time or
>> tenderness. I think it will help if you keep your cooking pot covered with
>> a good lid. The lid will help lock in the moisture and the flavors of your
>> food. This is not to say, that you don’t have to continue monitoring it,
>> stirring,  and perhaps adding extra liquid if necessary. . A lid can also
>> help with cutting down on the length of cooking time required. Although
>> beans take a long time.
>>
>> As for putting all three types of beans in one pot, I think that’s fine
>> unless the recipe has specifically directed you to do it differently for
>> some reason.
>>
>> Good luck.
>>
>> Eileen
>>
>> From: Dani Pagador via Cookinginthedark
>> Sent: Saturday, July 8, 2017 3:32 AM
>> To: cookinginthedark
>> Cc: Dani Pagador
>> Subject: [CnD] How Do You Know When Something is Simmering?
>>
>> Hi, Everyone.
>> I'm trying to cook beans that I soaked earlier today--I started at 10:00A
>> and let them soak till 7:00 or so.
>>
>> The Joy of Cooking website says to bring the water to a boil, then cook
>> the beans at a low simmer till they're tender.
>>
>> Sightlings see little bubbles on the surface of the water/sauce they're
>> simmering. Whatscookingamerica says the simmer temperature is between 190
>> and 200 degrees F.
>>
>> I'm going to take Dale up on his statement that no question is a stupid
>> question.
>>
>> So novice stovetop cook asks: How does the nonvisual cook monitor whether
>> something is simmering? Do I need to babysit the beans and monitor the
>> water temperature?
>>
>> And if I'm putting three kinds of dry beans in what I hope will be chili,
>> do I need to cook each batch separately, or can I dump the white, black,
>> and pinto beans all in to one pot and cook them together before adding
>> them to the chili mix?
>>
>> Thanks,
>> Dani
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