[Mm-friends] low tech

Jenine Stanley jeninems at icloud.com
Mon Sep 5 20:13:05 CEST 2016


Hi Mary and Lynnette, 

Thanks, you guys have no idea how much fun we had recording that show. 

Oh Mary, I took Optacon training about 35 years ago now and really wanted one but couldn’t make the rehab case for one at that time. Instead, my counselor got me a computer. See where that went? 

I loved the Optacon’s ability to allow you to recognize different fonts as well as just to read. I never thought of using it to read dials and such but that would have been and still may be for you, an amazing thing. 

I love low tech stuff as well and am looking forward to getting both the imperial and metric versions of the tactile caliper from I believe it’s National Braille press. 

I’ll give everyone a short review once i get them. I’ve been dying for a tactile caliper for metric units for years now. 

The Braille Super Store had a very nifty little device that came on a keyring. It’s just a plastic press but it has braille and print denominations of US money so you can actually stamp your money once you identify it initially with something like the iBill or Money Identifier app. 
> On Sep 5, 2016, at 6:49 PM, Lynnette Tatum via Mm-friends <mm-friends at acbradio.org> wrote:
> 
> Agreed. . the show was positively packed with great info!
> Keep up the excellent work, Main Menu Gang!
> Lynnette
> 
> 
> -----Original Message----- From: Mary Emerson via Mm-friends Sent: Monday, September 05, 2016 2:41 PM To: MM Friends Cc: Mary Emerson Subject: [Mm-friends] low tech 
> Hi all,
> 
> 
> I really enjoyed this past week's show, having received the podcast this morning. Thanks for such a great show about low tech!
> 
> 
> I still have some older technology, and I think there's still a place for it. For example, I've been an optacon user for forty years; the optacon is a device that can be used to read print, although you need to know the shapes of print characters to use it. It uses a camera that you move across a page, computer screen, or other item with print on it; the camera sees the image of each character, and sends it to vibrating reeds that pop up on a small plate; the reeds form the image shapes on the plate, and you feel them with one finger. I've used the optacon to read buttons and dials on appliances. For example, my microwave has a flat panel; I used the optacon to read the panel, row by row. I knew what everything on each row was for, and where to put the stick-on dots.
> 
> 
> Although optacons aren't manufactured any more, mine has served me well. In fact, I used it to read computer screens during the first fifteen years of my career. I used it to learn the keyboard that came with my first PC. A couple years ago I got a Crosely Princess phone, a replica of the ones that came out in the 1960s, but with modern electronics inside. Instead of the old rotary dial, buttons are arranged in a circle. The optacon came in handy because the pound and star are before the number 1, and the numbers are arranged counter-clockwise, similar to the old rotary phones. I put stick-on dots on some buttons to help with orientation.
> 
> 
> Mary
> 
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